Fettucine with pea pods and mushrooms – 3 April 2017

I ran across this old favorite recipe in Georgeanne Brennan’s Potager a couple weeks ago, and wondered if brother B might like it. Score! He loved it! I was telling him before we ate that I should (facetiously) have hm rate each dinner on a scale of “make this every night” to “never even speak of this again,” and once he ventured to try this one, he rated it “every night.” Easy to like, with its butter and salt, but also the flavor blend is just sumptuous. I’ll write in the recipe as I make it, for two. The original says it serves 4, but my notes say it serves 3, and that held. This is 2/3 of the recipe, but with the mushrooms doubled.

Pre-prep:

Clean and slice mushrooms (brown or white) to make 2/3 cup (this is double the original recipe).

Clean and de-thread 2/3 cup peapods. For beauty, leave uncut; for eatability, cut in half crosswise to make bite-sized pieces. Place in as close as possible to one layer on a steamer rack.

Wash, dry, and clip enough chives to make something like 4 tsp.

Grate about 1/6 cup parmaggiano.

Grind 1/3 tsp black pepper.

Cooking:

Boil a small layer of water in a pan large enough to hold the steamer with pea pods. When the water boils, place the steamer in the pan and cover. Steam 1 minute; the pods should turn rich green. Remove the steamer from the pan.

Boil enough water for the 8 oz fettucine and cook according to package directions.

About the time the pasta goes into the water, saute the mushrooms in about 1 Tbsp butter, adding a generous 1/2 tsp salt to them. Saute “until just barely cooked, 2 to 3 minutes.” Timing: It’s ideal for the mushrooms to be still warm, and the butter still melted, when the pasta is done and drained.

Drain the pasta well. [I use the pasta water to heat the bowls I will serve this in, so they are very hot when dinner starts.] Return the fettucine to the hot pan (possibly first returning the pan to the stove a bit to evaporate the last of the water). I leave this on low to keep everything warm.

Add:

About 4 tsp heavy cream. My notes say I have used half and half and it was fine.

1/3 tsp freshly ground black pepper (but who measures black pepper?)

Another 1/2 tsp salt

3 Tbsp butter (cut up, for faster melting

The parmaggiano and HALF the chives.

Then fold in the mushrooms and the pea pods. The mushrooms have most of the salt in the recipe, so be sure to distribute them well. Fold until the butter is well melted.

[You can do this mixing step in a very well heated bowl if you prefer, but I found it easier to keep warm in the pasta pan.]

Serve:

Empty the water from the heated serving bowls and wipe with a clean cloth. Serve out the pasta, and top with the remaining chives.

Enjoy!

We had more of the 1.5 liter bottle of Chateau Ste. Michelle Chardonnay, B’s favorite white. A fine choice for this pasta. Brother B said we should use this up before I left, rather than having the CalStar chard I was planning on, so we will save that for another visit.

Lunch:

I tested out heating up two of the somosas we were given yesterday, leftovers from the Holi lunch. I heated them 15 minutes at 350, on a small baking dish, and they were terrific. There were no sauces at the lunch, and when I looked online for a recipe it had all sorts of things I didn’t really want to go buy, so I had these without sauce, too. Added in a couple of mandarins from Giant.

Here are some lovely tiny daffodils our neighbor H brought over, which can be planted in the yard later:

 

 

This entry was posted in Meatless, Pasta, Uncategorized, Vegetarian and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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